What is The Salvation Army Kettle Campaign?

The tradition of Salvation Army kettles began in San Francisco in 1891 with Captain Joseph McFee. Captain McFee was looking for a way to help provide meals to families in need and recalled the “Simpson’s pot” – a large pot used in Liverpool, England into which passers-by threw charitable donations. Captain McFee decided to place a similar pot at the Oakland ferry landing. By strategically placing the kettle, he was able to attract donations from those going to and from the ferry boats.

Now, over 100 years have passed and beyond providing Christmas dinners, the money raised at kettles is also used to provide clothing, shelter, food, toys, financial assistance and counselling year-round. The Salvation Army’s holiday fund-raising activities play a crucial role in sharing the spirit of the season with families in need. The Salvation Army does its best to ensure that no family goes without food, no child is without presents under the tree and that Christmas is a time of hope and healing.

.

What is a bell ringer?

A Bell Ringer is someone who stands beside the iconic Salvation Army Christmas Kettle and receives donations from passers-by.  They ring bells where permitted to subtly remind people of those in need at Christmas in our community.  Kettles in Kamloops are located in malls and outside retail stores from the 13th of November to December 24th.

.

How will COVID impact this year’s Kettle Campaign?

We continue to encourage good hygiene and regular hand washing. All volunteers are required to self-assess before each shift and to let us know if they are unwell and not able to volunteer. No handouts of any kind will be distributed this year. Frequently used items will be regularly sanitized and volunteers will be provided with appropriate PPE. We encourage adherence to physical distancing measures and discourage congregating around the kettle.

.

COVID-19 Self-Assessment Tool

This tool has been developed to support schools, activity organizers, employers, businesses and facility operators in reducing the risk of transmission of COVID-19 among attendees/staff. The tool is meant to be used to assist with assessing attendees who may be symptomatic, or who may have been exposed to someone who is ill or has confirmed COVID-19.

.

Volunteers are required to use this self-assessment tool DAILY before their shift to ensure the health and safety of themselves and those around them.

It is also recommended to do this the day before your shift so that you can let us know as soon as possible if you are unable to work your shift.

An online version is also available here – https://bc.thrive.health/covid19/en.

If you answer YES to any of the questions below, you need to contact us and your local health authority immediately.

.

1. Do you have any new onset (or worsening of any of the following symptoms:

  • fever
  • cough
  • shortness of breath / difficulty breathing
  • runny nose
  • sore throat
  • chills
  • muscle or joint pain
  • weakness or unusual fatigue
  • loss of taste / smell
  • headache

.

2. Have you travelled outside of Canada within the last 14 days?

.

3. Have you had close contact with a confirmed case of COVID-19 in the last 14 days?

.

* Please note, if you test positive for COVID during the Kettle season, to contact us immediately. *

.

Click here to return to the Main Kettles landing page.